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    Entries in horse back (2)

    Saturday
    Mar042017

    Can a Horse's Back Issues Affect Their Internal Organs?

     

     

    They can, but this answer must be carefully qualified. Firstly, I always promote the services of Equine Sport Performance as correction and optimization of issues involving the joints, muscles, soft tissues (fascia), and neurological functions of the horse, specifically in relation to the back, neck, hips, shoulders, and legs. 

    Having said all that, now consider the following: A horse has a finite amount of energy at any given time to supply the overall function of the entire body, not only in the musculoskeletal system but all systems of the body. This is in addition to energy expended while carrying a rider and executing the demands of the rider. Any additional stress which draws energy away from normal functions can decrease the efficiency of those functions. When the body is dealing with back issues which involve abnormally tight muscles, loss of full joint motion and inefficient neurological function, the resulting asymmetry and unbalanced movement takes more energy than movement without these issues, especially with a rider aboard. With these issues continuing uncorrected the horse will still keep going, but the horse's body is in a continuous state of damage and repair at the cellular level. Energy is constantly diverted to the areas that are taking abnormal stress and are in this continuous cycle of damage and repair. 

    Does this draw from other systems that can possibly lose efficiency and even break down after a while? To what extent is debatable, but most agree that it certainly can. Suffice to say that a horse that is happily moving with no pain or discomfort in their joints or muscles will also likely have better digestion and elimination, as well as other bodily functions. Just like us.

    There are certainly many external and internal factors which can contribute to the inefficiency and dysfunction of the internal organs of a horse. Neuro-musculoskeletal (i.e., back pain) issues are only one possibility and although they may not be a causative factor, they can certainly be a contributory factor to a horse's overall well-being or lack thereof. In many cases these issues are among the most easily addressed with proper therapeutic intervention, maintenance and most importantly, prevention. Why not at least eliminate this possibility, and insure that this highly important aspect of your horse's health is covered?

    Equine Sport Performance is dedicated to provide the finest in state of the art procedures to keep your horse's neuro-musculoskeletal systems functioning at maximum efficiency, providing maximum benefits to your horse at minimal cost to you. Contact me today. 


     

    Friday
    Feb032017

    Why You Must Make Back Care Part of Your Horse's Health Routine

     

    “No hoof, no horse.” This is the mantra that farriers, hoof trimmers, and all manner of hoof care specialists have instilled in the minds of the horseback riding public, and rightfully so. Putting your weight on a horse puts additional burden on the structures of the foot, resulting in altered patterns of growth and wear. Add to this the restriction of movement imposed on most horses by keeping them in stalls, and you now have the necessity of regular outside intervention of hoof care specialists in order to prevent these altered patterns from crippling a horse. In addition, if you aren't regularly taking care of your horse's feet, everybody can see it, so farriers and other hoof care specialists are quite busy taking care of everybody's horses. Wild horses have no need for hoof care, and most horses that have been turned out to pasture with no further attempts by humans to ride them need little if any further hoof care.

    Putting your weight on a horse also puts additional burden on the structures of the horse's spine and spinal joints. This results in altered patterns of stress not only on the spinal joints, but the supporting muscles, tendons and ligaments in the spine. The spine has a wonderful feedback mechanism in the nervous system that is designed to protect the vital nerves and structures of the spine when stress accumulates and is starting to cause damage. Unfortunately, the degenerative changes and loss of function associated with this mechanism aren't visually apparent to the average rider like the feet are. A horse eventually begins to experience pain and discomfort from this accumulation of stress, but many riders interpret the signs as misbehavior or stubbornness. Renee Tucker, DVM in her book “Where Does My Horse Hurt?” states:

    “The best way for a horse to tell you they hurt is by refusing to do something.”

    If ignored, the vital structures will begin to break down. Spinal joints will develop arthritis, tendons in the legs will become inflamed, and overworked muscles will develop a chronic syndrome not unlike fibromyalgia in humans. And no, pain medication does not solve this, only serving to temporarily mask the symptoms. 

    Proper and regular care of a horse's spine and associated structures will prevent this from happening and maintain a horse's maximum health and performance. Equine Sport Performance is dedicated to provide the finest in state of the art procedures to keep your horse's back at maximum comfort with minimal maintenance cost. Contact Dr. Reuben today for more information.

    So remember: 

    No BACK, horse out of WHACK,

    And he ain't worth JACK

    And that's a FACT, Mack!