Connect with Us
Keep In Touch

Sign up for our Newsletter

This form does not yet contain any fields.
    « Can a Horse's Back Issues Affect Their Internal Organs? | Main | The Ultimate Athlete - The Racehorse »
    Friday
    Feb032017

    Why You Must Make Back Care Part of Your Horse's Health Routine

     

    “No hoof, no horse.” This is the mantra that farriers, hoof trimmers, and all manner of hoof care specialists have instilled in the minds of the horseback riding public, and rightfully so. Putting your weight on a horse puts additional burden on the structures of the foot, resulting in altered patterns of growth and wear. Add to this the restriction of movement imposed on most horses by keeping them in stalls, and you now have the necessity of regular outside intervention of hoof care specialists in order to prevent these altered patterns from crippling a horse. In addition, if you aren't regularly taking care of your horse's feet, everybody can see it, so farriers and other hoof care specialists are quite busy taking care of everybody's horses. Wild horses have no need for hoof care, and most horses that have been turned out to pasture with no further attempts by humans to ride them need little if any further hoof care.

    Putting your weight on a horse also puts additional burden on the structures of the horse's spine and spinal joints. This results in altered patterns of stress not only on the spinal joints, but the supporting muscles, tendons and ligaments in the spine. The spine has a wonderful feedback mechanism in the nervous system that is designed to protect the vital nerves and structures of the spine when stress accumulates and is starting to cause damage. Unfortunately, the degenerative changes and loss of function associated with this mechanism aren't visually apparent to the average rider like the feet are. A horse eventually begins to experience pain and discomfort from this accumulation of stress, but many riders interpret the signs as misbehavior or stubbornness. Renee Tucker, DVM in her book “Where Does My Horse Hurt?” states:

    “The best way for a horse to tell you they hurt is by refusing to do something.”

    If ignored, the vital structures will begin to break down. Spinal joints will develop arthritis, tendons in the legs will become inflamed, and overworked muscles will develop a chronic syndrome not unlike fibromyalgia in humans. And no, pain medication does not solve this, only serving to temporarily mask the symptoms. 

    Proper and regular care of a horse's spine and associated structures will prevent this from happening and maintain a horse's maximum health and performance. Equine Sport Performance is dedicated to provide the finest in state of the art procedures to keep your horse's back at maximum comfort with minimal maintenance cost. Contact Dr. Reuben today for more information.

    So remember: 

    No BACK, horse out of WHACK,

    And he ain't worth JACK

    And that's a FACT, Mack!      

    Reader Comments

    There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

    PostPost a New Comment

    Enter your information below to add a new comment.

    My response is on my own website »
    Author Email (optional):
    Author URL (optional):
    Post:
     
    Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>