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    « Why You Must Make Back Care Part of Your Horse's Health Routine | Main | How Many Treatments Does My Horse Need? »
    Tuesday
    Jan082013

    The Ultimate Athlete - The Racehorse 

    The Racehorse. It's horse Drag Racing. But these drag racers go for a full mile around a track. It would be fun to see real drag race machines go for such a distance, but most would probably explode.

    The Racehorse goes this distance without exploding, surprising considering the intense forces generated within this living high performance machine during a race.

    The entire musculoskeletal system of the racehorse is worked violently during a race, the weight-bearing surface of the spine as well as the neck, shoulder and sacroilliac joints all being subjected to tremendous stresses.

    These stresses can easily trigger the built-in protective response of the joints that house the spinal cord and nerve roots. Unlike other joints in the horse's body, these spinal joints cannot simply "give way" if their load capacity is exceeded, for there would be catastrophic injury to vital information-carrying nerve structures. They therefore have a built-in "failsafe mechanism" which creates immediate protection to these joints in the form of muscle guarding or "splinting". In extreme cases this may appear as a muscle spasm, but mostly it occurs as increased levels of muscle tension in a particular area. This muscle tension, while providing protection for the overstressed joint, will unfortunately restrict motion of that joint as well. The horse will be reluctant to use any areas adjacent to this "fixated" joint; for instance -  shoulder motion will appear to be restricted when the lower cervical spine (lower neck) is being protected by muscle guarding or splinting. Hip and rear leg motion will be restricted by splinting in the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joints.

    Once the stressful event is over however, the reflex does not shut itself off. It will simply go dormant until increased demands are once again placed upon the affected spinal joint or joints. The joint motion will once again be restricted and the horse will be uncomfortable performing movements that require freedom of motion in the joint. This will result in less than optimum performance from the horse, and decrease chances of winning. 

    Reversing this reflex pattern is where Dr. Reuben's Joint and Muscle Release Technique comes in. The joint is released to perform normal motion using the powered activator, which provides a precision directed, mechanically assisted movement of the spinal joint. The effect is much like resetting a tripped circuit breaker. Myofascial release is then performed using the Arthrostim which stretches and releases muscle tissue 14 times per second, dispersing lactic acid and other stagnant toxins as well as fibrous adhesions out of the muscles.

    The result is a drag racing machine firing on all cylinders! 

      

      

    References (10)

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      Dr. Michael Reuben, Dr. Jeff Schafer, Equine Sport Performance - Blog - The Ultimate Athlete - The Racehorse 
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      Response: Check This Out
      Nice Site, Preserve the good work. Thanks!
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      Dr. Michael Reuben, Dr. Jeff Schafer, Equine Sport Performance - Blog - The Ultimate Athlete - The Racehorse
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      Dr. Michael Reuben, Dr. Jeff Schafer, Equine Sport Performance - Blog - The Ultimate Athlete - The Racehorse
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      Dr. Michael Reuben, Dr. Jeff Schafer, Equine Sport Performance - Blog - The Ultimate Athlete - The Racehorse
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      Dr. Michael Reuben, Dr. Jeff Schafer, Equine Sport Performance - Blog - The Ultimate Athlete - The Racehorse
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      Dr. Michael Reuben, Dr. Jeff Schafer, Equine Sport Performance - Blog - The Ultimate Athlete - The Racehorse
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      Dr. Michael Reuben, Dr. Jeff Schafer, Equine Sport Performance - Blog - The Ultimate Athlete - The Racehorse
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      Dr. Michael Reuben, Dr. Jeff Schafer, Equine Sport Performance - Blog - The Ultimate Athlete - The Racehorse
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